The Data Linkedin has

While I’m at it, I thought I’d take a look at what data linkedin.com has on me. It’s likely to be much less, since I rarely use the service and it’s been getting less and less as their emails with anything useful, plus new contacts, connect requests etc. always take me to the Google Play app store to install the linkedin app. That’s not happening, and I mostly just delete the emails and make a mental note to login via the website.

If you are interested in your linkedin data, you can get it via the linkedin.com Settings and then Privacy page. Here.

The email that arrived with a link said:

Here’s just the first part of the information we have archived for you, including things like connections, contacts, messages, and profile information.

It seems that will likely be the more interesting part of their archive. The first .zip file seems to mostly include only static data, most of which I’ve provided.

Interestingly, I joined linkedin on April 11th, 2006. I learned that from the registration .csv.

At least in the .zip file I got it had the following structure.

The media files were very limited, just two image files, and a PDF of a presentation that I posted directly to linkedin. This clearly isn’t all my data from linkedin, since it did not contain and links, articles, or images I’ve posted. It didn’t for example even include my profile and profile background pictures.

The spreadsheets were no more than comma seperated variables, but seemed fairly accurate. There is no clue how they came about these, I can only assume from businesses I “liked” etc. Here is the entire contents of the “Causes you care about” .csv

Civil Rights and Social Action
Economic Empowerment
Environment
Human Rights
Politics
Science and Technology

Which seems about right. What I’m sure most people will be interested in are the contacts that linkedin has a mix of my personal contacts, and linkedin connections. For each “connection” it has firstname, surname, physical address, email address,current employment/employer, position, a date and time field(?) and finally a web address.

The physical address doesn’t seem to have come from my contacts, which I’m pretty sure I’ve not given linkedin access to via the app or a website link/upload. The majority of physical addresses are blank, even for people I have work/home addresses in my contacts.

So I think this is pretty much

Move on, nothing to see here!

When the 2nd .zip file arrives, I’ll add another post.

Facebook has a lot of questions to answer

I teetered on the brink of deleting my facebook account last year. I removed the main app from my phone and a Windows tablet, and have never installed messenger. When it came down to it I balked at the final step. I did ulike pretty much all businesses and pages, as well as unfriended anyone not a real contact/friend etc.

The utility of facebook is still too great to remove myself completely. Although frankly I’ve had better results contacting businesses through Twitter and getting things done. Given it’s reach, facebook still remains useful. Delete the apps Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Instagram and Whatsapp.

If you want to delete your facebook account, it’s still relatively simple and you have 14-days to recover it, if you decide it was a mistake. Use this URL.

The Guardian published this over the weekend. It’s a long and important read that contains all the context and background detail into how Facebook was used to target people with advertising and social  profiling of potentailly millions of people to bias or persuade them to take a particular perspective.

Much of this data came through those terrible apps which ask you to confirm access to your facebook profile, and your friends profile. Even though you may have never used one of these apps, if your friends did, they likely gave away your data.

The New York Times is today reporting that Facebooks Chief Information Security officer is leaving the company. So this is obviously a big deal. Alex himself denies that, although with the share price drop already seen today, who knows the truth, the data misappropriation is still a big deal.

Charles Arthur has a daily email which goes out under the guise of The Overspill from his blog of the same name. It’s well worth the subscription. Todays included a link to Justin Hendrix blog for justsecurity.org on the Facebook data use, in it Justin poses seven key questions:

1. Why did Facebook take more than two years to inform the public of this massive breach?

2. Did the Trump campaign or Cambridge Analytica violate campaign finance laws?

3. Did Trump campaign or Cambridge Analytica employees lie to Congress, or to the British Parliament?

4. Did Facebook’s failure to disclose this breach to the public and notify its directly affected consumers break any laws?

5. Did any of the Facebook embeds in the Trump campaign know that stolen data was being used for targeting?

6. Did Facebook have evidence its own employees mishandled this situation? Was any disciplinary action taken?

7. Did other organizations or individuals exploit these apparent weaknesses, and are there other breaches we do not know about?

Irrespective of what you think about how the data was used, and the outcome, these questions need to be answered.

Someone knocking at the door

We had a spirited discussion over coffee today about the whole NSA data collection fuss  and sparked by the continuing refusal of the UK Government to accept there is a case to be concerned,  even if you have “nothing to hide”.

Think of it this way.  You are sat at home,  there is a knock at the door.  You answer  it’s that nice man from the NSA,  he says “excuse me,  we’d like a few minutes of your time,  can you just write down every phone call you’ve made in the last 3-months, what time of day you made the call,  what number you called,  how long the call lasted.”. –  you say why,  they say,  dunno,  may make some sense in the future.

Going to give it to them?  Going to call a lawyer?  Done anything wrong?  –  well good news,  you don’t need to,  they won’t come knocking,  they’ve got all the data anyway.

Then,  remember that phone call you had?  You know,  the crazy guy that your cousin thought would be a an interesting match up,  he called you? No?  Well never mind,  the NSA does. 

He called you from his Walmart cellphone,  me they want to  know what you discussed.  At the time when he ranted on about the PM of Saudi Arabia you never gave it a 2nd thought,  turns out a couple of years later the PM was assassinated by some nut job who had that phone on him…  You remember what you said?

Dam right the NSA shouldn’t have any of your digital data unless they get permission from you,  before collecting it.

Still confused?