Look & See – Rural America

I’ve written a number of harsh posts about those living in rural America, mostly based off the perception that is pushed by the Republican party, that is, rural Americans don’t understand, and resent urban Americans. That rural Americans are the god-fearing, backbone of America and urban and city dwellers are welfare dependents, and worse still, socialists. Certainly, the Republican party continue to push this agenda today, dividing sub-urban and rural communities from the cities.

As shown here, rural Americans claiming benefits has sky rocketed between ’96 and 2015; increasingly, the programs getting cut, adversely hit rural America harder, as rural Americans are smaller in total number; medical coverage may not “be a right” according to the Republican party, it should be a “choice”, try maintaining a community without easy access to modern healthcare; schools are also a right, without them, not only are local taxes higher, more subsidy is needed to get kids to schools outside the city. School Choice won’t save rural schools without a massive rethink.

However, rural Americans, and farmers especially, deserve another perspective. They’ve largely been screwed by the “agricultural industrial machine”. Sure, many farmers have sold out and reaped substantial profits, more though are barely getting by. There is a lot to be said about a community completely upended over the last 30-years.

Laura Dunn, Two Birds Film (Austin TX) has produced a beautifully filmed, subtle, but brilliantly edited, and panoramic, poignant portrait of the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America in the era of industrial agriculture, as seen through the eye of American novelist, poet, and activist, Wendell Berry.

Berry represents, if not the best known defender of rural, natural America, then certainly the most eloquent. His contributions to Lauras’ other major work, The Unforseen, were the first I’d heard of him. Certainly, this profile certainly made me think again. You can watch the trailer on youtube(below) or the complete film on Netflix.

Recycling Futures

A year ago a bale of waste paper was worth $100 a ton, today you have to pay $15 per ton to get it taken away.

That’s not free to you, the cost is hidden in your charges.

recyclingI’m in the midst of switching waste/trash haulers for our HOA. The HOA took a vote last year to switch at the end of the contract. As it turns out the city service for the identical cart service is more expensive than our HOA hauler.

This is a big deal, especially in the era of everything by Amazon and e-commerce.

That’s missing the point though. The city service is aimed at reducing landfill needs, and quite rightly so. They charge by size of trash and composting bins, and whatever size recycling is thrown in for free.

Our current HOA service is mostly just aimed at taking stuff away. We were able to require the existing hauler into doing year-around composting, although a number of people have claimed to have seen the hauler just dump the composting in with the trash. I talked to the City Public Works Director about their service, only to find out that it ends in August next year, and right about the time we move HOA Residents to the city service, they’ll be issuing a RFP for a new 5-year contract.

It’s likely then we are going to be caught between a rock and a hard place. If we stick with the existing hauler, we’ll likely get charged more for a less than optimal service. If we switch, we are likely to be in a bigger pool, which could make recycling even more expensive when the contract is renewed.

At least the communities I’ve lived in, in America, have been lazy recyclers. Back in the mid-80’s, recycling/reuse increasing came into people’s consciousness, it was all pretty specific, especially around glass, and can recycling. Many States instituted deposit schemes, and encouraged collection and recycling. For most though, the deposit schemes never lasted, people were too lazy after a few years, and just reverted to trashing them.

Single-stream_pile_IMG_0995ed[1]
Single stream recycling waiting go to to the “Materials Recovery Facility” (MRF).
Single stream recycling was seen as a simple way to encourage Americans to recycle, it’s been hugely successful, and a disaster. Many Americans don’t even try to understand the recycling process, or even wonder how the materials they dump in their single stream recycling cart make it back into raw materials to be reused. If it’s paper or plastic, they just put it in the single stream cart/bin. Some people jam stuff in the Single stream cart, well, because it wont fit in the trash. It’s then someone elses problem.

In a move, mostly unrelated to the Presidents tariff war with China, the Chinese have so much low grade recycling, that they are no longer just accepting low grade recycling material. This is a big deal, especially in the era of everything by Amazon and e-commerce.

What’s the problem?

amazon-prime-514x383[1]
Doesn’t go in the recycling cart; Needs special service; Must have paper label removed.
Take for example that Amazon 100% recyclable plastic shipping envelopes, just like the one in the picture. These don’t go in single stream recycling. They have to be handled by speciality bag recyclers.

However, even if everyone does what we do and keep a large sack in the garage for plastic bags and take it to their specialist local collection point, in our case Eco-cycle in Boulder, it’s still not that simple.

Your amazon shipping bag has a paper address label stuck on it. Unless that label is completely removed, the bag is just another example of junk recycling. The only way to turn the bag back into recyclable plastic pellets, is to soak the bag, and then use a chemical mixture to dissolve the paper. At scale, ten of thousands per month, doesn’t make this practical. Picking the labels off is difficult and time consuming, better is just to take a pair of scissors and cut the label off and put it in the trash before putting the bag asides to take to specialist recycling. There are loads of other examples

We recently bought a new TV. Aside from a massive paperboard box, it came with a large amount of styrofoam packing material. Styrofoam needs specialist recycling, just because you can jam ito into your trash cart, don’t. It will get crushed and numerous stages and the styrofoam particles eventually end up in landfill and last 500+ years.

Don’t put it in recycling either. Just because you can jam it in, doesn’t mean it won’t end up in landfill, it will, only at twice the haulage cost. If you have a service that penalizes you for “bad materials” in recycling, you deserve to get ticketed. If your styrofoam makes it to the single stream recycling location, it will either be sorted by machine, or often by hand into the trash. That’s not free to you, the cost is hidden in your charges.

That’s not free to you, the cost is hidden in your charges.

The list goes on and on. Tires and inner tubes; shredded paper; food packing(if it has any kind of wax or plastic liner), broken drinking glasses or lightbulbs; almost anything with plastic packing tape, even cardboard.. It all has to be either stripped, or should go in the trash.

All this has to be sorted, cleaned, and then sent to the actual plant where it is converted. The sorting is expensive and  the less “pure” it is, the less it’s worth. Even bottle tops and can lids, carton tops should be trashed, they are not recyclable. In fact, pretty much anything under 3-inches can’t be recycled as it’s too small to pass through the machines.

The Market for recycling

A year ago a bale of waste paper was worth $100 a ton, today you have to pay $15 per ton to get it taken away.

Even the market for that stalwart of recycling, paper, has tanked. Formally cities were paid by the ton for the single stream recycling materials, after sorting. Now, they are paying to have them taken away.  While you can still find baled waste paper contracts for $100 or more per ton, thats waste paper at the mill, not ready to be shipped from the MRF. A year ago a bale of waste paper was worth $100 a ton, today you have to pay $15 per ton to get it taken away.

Interestingly, amid the recycling crisis, the same thing that has happened in other industries is also happening to US paper mills, they are getting bought by Chinese companies. It’s not clear what this will mean for recycling, but it will increasingly mean the Chinese are able to control the price.

What Can we do?

Be a conscientious recycler. If in doubt, throw it in the trash. Compost where you can, recycle diligently. Remember everything you put in recycling that ends up in trash costs twice as much to haul and still ends up in landfills. Even where landfills do NOT pollute the ground, or ground water, they do smell. Many things that end up in landfill will last hundreds of years.

Buying land for landfills; preparing them; managing them is an expensive business. Most people wouldn’t want to live near a landfill for just the noise of trucks coming and going, much less the smell. Yet we can’t live without landfills, the further away from our homes they are, the more it costs to haul trash there. The alternative would be incinerators, and while the science is good, the fear of air pollution is real. At least for now, landfill is the only alternative to recycling.

One of the best videos I’ve seen on single stream recycling comes from our own Boulder County Recycling Center. It should be compulsory viewing for everyone. While watching, remember, our taxes are paying for the locations, machines, energy, and people who make it “simple” for you to do recycling, via single stream recycling. Even after all this, we are now having to pay for many of the resource bundles to be taken away for re-use.

The second video covers hard to recycle and problem materials with answer son what to do with them.

Please feel free to leave comments and questions.

Your infrequent reminder, Facebook is evil

They figured out how do you tweak people’s vanities and their passions and their susceptibilities and their desires in order to keep them on the site.

Source: The Central Question Behind Facebook: ‘What Does Mark Zuckerberg Believe In?’ : NPR

If you have not heard it, the above NPR Fresh Air interview by Dave Davies with Evan Osnos, a New Yorker Staff writer is well worth the listen.

Since that interview, we’ve had two more announcements of significance from Facebook.

October 11th, the evil empire announced that they’d disabled some 66 accounts or what Facebook described as:

dozens of accounts and profiles belonging to Russian database provider SocialDataHub

SocialDataHub provides analytical services to the Russian government. Facebook said SocialDataHub were “scraping” peoples information. Who knows how much information, how they used it, or who they sold it too. Facebook don’t. It looks live another 50-million accounts at least. [Check here if your account was compromised.]

The October 8th, Facebook announced their “Portal”, basically a tablet and web cam that allows you to make video calls to other Portal-users, and follows you around the room. Facebook of course says Privacy is

‘Very, Very, Very Important’

But let’s be honest, are you really willing to stay on facebook? Who in their right mind would allow facebook to live video them and not screw up the privacy, and even if they don’t, they’ll be analysing the Sh*t out of everything in every frame to identify things to sell to advertisers about you.

Can facebook do this securely and respecting your privacy? You bet your life not.

#DELETEFACEBOOK Start doing it now. #DELETFACEBOOK, and the women you will wow. (With apologies to Cole Porter).

https://www.facebook.com/help/delete_account

My other facebook posts.

Delete your Google+ profile

Google+ is what happens when you try to take on an incumbent, don’t communicate your vision, and then leave the rotting carcass to fester and be eaten by the maggots. In this case the maggots were a

security vulnerability that exposed the private data of up to 500,000 users

It turns out Google knew about the vulnerability back in March 2018, but decided not to disclose it as, as far they know, it hadn’t been exploited. If your data was upto date and complete, there was enough there to perform a rudimentary phishing attack.

In my case, my phone number, location and a number of other items were out of date, so I didn’t wait to find out what Google were going to do, I just went ahead and deleted my Google+ account. Google has also announced they will kill Google+ although it’s not clear completely what will be removed.

In the post Google+ world, it’s been clear for a while that Google is moving much of the community and information sourcing features into Google Maps.

Here is a link if you want to go ahead and delete your Google+ profile instead of waiting for Google to clean up the mess.

Source: Delete your Google+ profile – Google+ Help

Why You Shouldn’t Use Facebook to Log In to Other Sites – The New York Times

This is a good explanation of why it is way past time to stop using your Facebook ID to login to other sites. Personally while I still occasionally wish I could login to facebook to check on relatives, otherwise I don’t miss it at all.

No matter what facebook do, there will continue to be security and privacy breaches like this. Facebook wanted to become “the web” and along with that aspiration, they also became a focal point for all the hackers, scammers, and those wishing to game the system.

#deletefacebook

 

Source: Why You Shouldn’t Use Facebook to Log In to Other Sites – The New York Times

Amazon’s $15 Minimum Wage Won’t Change How Americans See Work – Bloomberg

n 2017, the real median household income in the U.S. was $61,372, which is roughly what two earners with full-time jobs making $15 an hour would make.

I remain totally confused about class as a term to classify people in America. This article is a prime example. While overall this is good news, if $15-per hour helps the middle class, how little do you have to earn to be working class? And why is that term never used?

As far as I’m aware the amazon deal doesn’t include health insurance, which effectively means before taxes, you’ll have to work for nearly 1-week in 4 just to pay for an individual plan, for a family plan, you’ll be working for just over two weeks every month just to pay your health insurance premiums. Then there’s food, rent, transportation etc. and so who knows where you are going to find the average $4,533 deductibles if you do get sick. Rather than working class, you are the working poor.

If two people have to work for a couple to survive they are working class. Telling them they are “Middle class” if they earn more than $22 is just a great example of gaslighting. To be middle class,  surely it means when one of you can chose not to work.

Source: Amazon’s $15 Minimum Wage Will Won’t Change How Americans See Work – Bloomberg

Keeping Notebooks

Last week, those of us paying attention watched the bizarre spectacle of Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh getting emotional about his calendars. I’ve never kept a paper calendar, it alway seemed too much of a constraint. Around the year 2000, I toyed with keeping a planner/calendar online, thanks to the Internet Archive, I can still see my mad travel schedule.

What I have kept, since 1979, are notebooks. I still have most of them(*1), they are both interesting and dull. The changing over to a new notebook is always much more than turning over a new page, it’s more like the start of a new era. The notebook is a fabulous moleskin notebook, courtesy of First Line Software, given to me 3-years ago while I was still at Dell.new notebook

My last notebook was good for a couple of years. It contained notes, to-do lists, project activities and more. Most of this was about my transition from being an executive at Dell, to being a husband and stay at home dad. It also covers some epic projects, which like my prior IT career, didn’t always go well. These included trying to get to grip with the US Medical billing system as my heart attack; also the epic screw-ups made by FRSR llc of Broomfield while landscaping my backyard.

Some of my old notebooks cover key developments in both my career and technology. I have notebooks over the period 1983-1985 as I grappled with learning how the US Banking system worked, the requirements of systems such as the SWIFT banking, interconnect system; virtualization of operating systems on 12Mb memory systems; working on protocols to transfer data between dissimilar architecture an data format systems, which lead to the precursor to the ARC file format, which lead to the Zip file format; later notebooks cover my introduction to X.25 Networks as we built out a worldwide financial services network; and then my whole career at IBM, including the arrival of the World Wide Web, and so much more.

Apart from the recollection and reflection. notebooks, correctly dated and annotated can have real value for technical architects and programmers. During a patent dispute in 1998, I was able to return to a notebook from 1985 and prove that the disputed patent wasn’t unique, even though I no longer had access the system we’d implemented it on, and the system was no longer in existence. While it the patent wasn’t invalidated, it did save us a massive licensing fee.

I look forward to all the events, actions, projects and plans over the next couple of years. Keep a notebook.

*1 It all went wrong for a few years when the Filofax was a thing.

The State of American Immigration

The state of American immigration is misunderstood, misapplied and subject to a lot of hysteria.

To me it continues to amaze that a country where you can drive for hours east and south in Colorado, west in Texas, and pass nothing. Absolutely nothing. I’m sure there are other US States where you can do this, I’ve just not driven through them.

America, with a number of Western countries, not least mine, the UK, have created massive disturbances and in some cases, wars persist as a direct result of our actions. Yet we have largely uninhabited geographic areas as big as some of these countries.

TAL covers a number of the key areas of Immigration, how it works, who is doing what, and what has been changing. It’s worth an hour of your life, if you don’t have that, Act 2 is especially worth it.

TAL
Let me count the ways

Data Interchange and Interoperability in Healthcare

I recently had to go for x-rays on my hip. The imaging company called saying they’d received the “order” from my chiropractor for a knee arthrogram without contrast.

Apparently, this was both wrong and confusing. It’s wrong, because the “order” said hip, but they couldn’t read it; also it’s confusing because, well something to do with x-ray and contrast.

After a short discussion, it turned out the imaging company received the order by fax. Yes, real actual paper fax. The US medical profession still seems to run on faxes. My prior cardiology hospital sent my medical records to my new cardiology Dr via, yes, paper fax. Hospital-1 printed the records to a fax based printer driver, which sent them uing a fax protocol to Hospital-2. Apparently Hospital-2 receives as images in a variation of the TIFF file format.

In the case of my PT, no such luck. Handwritten, manually faxed, received by paper. Even if there had been no problem this created a HIPPA privacy and security cost. In this instance, the cost to clear up the confusion likely cost almost as much as the actual hip x-ray, as that was all that was needed.

While I know there are data interchange standards in the USA for medical records, or as they are called PHRs, it seems there still nothing that is universally adopted. When I contacted my new cardiology hospital and offered my PHR in (Epic Systems) Lucy format, they declined and asked for them to be faxed.

There are a growing number of apps for both ios and android that support EHRs (electronic health records) however, for the most part these are tied to a specific hospital and/or medical group. A good example is the Epic Systems MyChart app. It can read the data from my former cardiology provider, including details of my ER/and cardio surgery and the prescriptions I was given. I can export the data using the Hospital groups website, and that’s it.

Unless you choose your medical providers not on their medical excellence, but their ability to import your lucy records, this is no use at all.

The Big Boys are doing data interchange

My interest was sparked by the recent announcement from Google, Microsoft, Twitter and Facebook introducing the open-source Data Transfer Project (DTP). For the more technically interested, you can read the DTP Overview here.

Ultimately it doesn’t look that different from the Enterprise Service Bus implementations we were working on 15-18 years ago. Same core concept, n-n interchange and interoperability. Same basic extensability through adapters and shared protocols.

I have to say, the use cases given for DTP are pretty weak. Conceptually, though there is much potential for this architected “Share…” facility. One of the key failings of DTP is that there is no ability to delete data, sure you can share your data to more sites/services but the DTP as specified doesn’t allow you to leave.

However, the most disappointing thing about this announcement is it’s aimed at allowing you to move your videos/photo’s, social media posts, and hopefully subscription platforms among the services supported.

To become a supported platform there are a few fairly simple architecture docs and then you have to build plugins or adapters to interface to the service to be able to send/receive data.

Ho hum. Boring. There is definitely space for big tech co’s to innovate around data interchange, but who cares about social media. I want to be able to pay for a PHR service, where I can store and control my medical record. Where I can grant access rights and authorise medical providers to retrieve my data, where I can see my medical records from across the providers etc.

I’m hoping that someone will point out this already exists, or that Nigel or Tom, who both now work in Helathcare will tell me why this isn’t a good idea. The USA is in desperate need for data interchange but it isn’t for social media.

FURTHER READING:

  1. Paper on moving from paper to electronic records and the associated problems.
  2. Review of numerous leading healthcare records mobile apps.

 

Maternity medical crisis

As we approach this year’s open enrollment period for health insurance, I continue to be shocked and disappointed about almost everything I learn about the US Healthcare system. Before I return to notes about my own experiences and my own health, maternity care is another healthcare topic that doesn’t often get discussed, as the average American prepares to pay more than $10,348, per person, per year on healthcare.

While many argue about the definition of single payer, and if it would lead to socialism (and what that is?), the inefficiency, mistakes, cost and just outright expense of what should be routine treatment, continues to make me despair.

America has healthcare snobs, millions of them, they just don’t realize that while they might have great access to medical facilities and Doctors, that doesn’t mean it’s always good, or that the system acts in their best interest. However, any suggested change is met with claims of death panels, socialism and more. Oft heard is also they ‘don’t want the Government in the healthcare.’

Even I was left speechless as I watched a recent CBS Sunday Morning segment on maternal healthcare. Among the points made were:

  • U.S. “most dangerous” place to give birth in developed world
  • The United States is ranked 46th when it comes to maternal mortality. That’s behind countries like Saudi Arabia and Kazakhstan.
  • “Sixty percent of the deaths in the United States are preventable,”
  • At least two women are dying every day

And it’s not about access to healthcare; it’s not about the poor without insurance; yes, there is a racial element, but it’s not what you’d think. Here is the entire segment, well worth watching before you enroll this year.

| Edit: The embedded video doesn’t apparently load in some browsers, so here is a direct link to the CBS This Morning web page. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/maternal-mortality-an-american-crisis/

Can it be true that women giving birth in America are more at risk than women in dozens of other countries?