How False Stories Spread And Why People Believe Them

One of the most valuable lessons the administration will learn, is that they cannot control the media, or social media. Constantly making false or inaccurate claims, using false data, or more importantly watching something on cable news and then twisting it to fit your own agenda is a dangerous game.

The more accurate and transparent the administration is, the less conspiracy theory talk there will be, the less time it will take to manage the media, the more the administration can focus on what they really want to do. This is a hard lesson to learn, but essential.

Otherwise everything gets stuck in the mire. Too much time denying, too much time correcting, too much time covering up, too much time on internal meetings trying to decide what to do and how to handle it. All that causes stress, wastes time, and drives distrust between staff members as they don’t know who to believe.

Back in December 2016, Dave Davies on NPR Fresh Air, spoke at length to Craig Silverman, Media Editor of BuzzFeed News about fake news. If you didn’t hear it, it’s well worth a listen. It’s especially relevant based on my slow but inexorable move to delete my facebook account.

Civilians, the Vietnam War, gun control

I didn’t move to America until 1982, the almost 20-year war was well over by the time I got to NY. I worked with a few managers who’d been in various services roles, allegedly my favorite VP was in a navy seal underwater demolition expert. The war was mostly never discussed.

I saw the films, as far as I recall I slept through most of Apocalypse Now not once, but twice. Last night I sat gripped through Zero Dark Thirty, as a docu-drama it was pretty good, didn’t waste time glamorizing the death of Osama bin Laden, and seemed at least to present most of the major talking points.

Afterwards when discussing the film, I said that “it presented a number of legal, social and international issues. Although on balance, I agree with the decision to go assassinate UBL in a foreign, nation state.”

Tonight I got to listen to Fresh Air, a NPR radio series. This show covered in large part the release of a new book, Nick Turses’ Kill Anything That Moves, about the Vietnam War. You can listen to, or read a transcript of the interview here

On balance, the juxtaposition of the film, and the NPR interview, especially with the harrowing description and discussion about the US armed forces killing more than 2,000,000 (yes two million+) civilians during the Vietnam war, that it’s not surprising the reluctance of many to give an inch on gun control.

Perhaps they are worried, not that their own government will be coming to get them, but that a small band of trained, government authorized Vietnamese assassins will fly in under the cover of darkness, come into their homes and assassinate them and their family?

Yes, it’s an extreme view, but you have to wonder with so many in positions of authority, in the government, the NRA and other organizations that were old enough to have served, or to have known first hand, or heard, the harrowing stories of the Vietnam war, why they they are resistant to any form of gun control?

[Update 1/30/12] Apparently this isn’t such an extreme view. Conflicting reports have this Vietnam vet. either defending himself, or assassinating someone for driving into the wrong driveway.