Apps, bad for your kids, worse for your privacy

(c) Some rights reserved by flickingerbrad on flickr
(c) Some rights reserved by flickingerbrad on flickr

I’ve argued this position from first hand experience for about 18-months. Apps in the stores both iTunes and Android have the ability to collect and direct information collected to unapproved websites. In a couple of instances, insisting on this has got me more trouble than I wanted.

Now days it’s much more common for an app to ask for permission and for people to accept and install without reading the permissions requested and thinking through the consequences of that. So it was interesting to see this in relation to the way adults let kids use this technology. Just last night at a dinner in a new, upscale restaurant, I watched a parent pull out an iPad and give it to her 9yr old child who then worked her way through dinner playing online. Seems innocent?

Yes, except you are giving away your location, and a lot of personal information which will be used to at least Spam you online or through apps in exchange for what? This article by the LA Times covers the issues.

Tax, Apple, Buffet, and doing the right thing

image from mainstreet.com
A number of people on my facebook stream have been posting and commenting on the ruckus over Apples tax avoidance, especially as it relates to iTunes, which even a Luxembourg Government official has jumped in to defend the iTunes tax evasion scheme. The other thread that has been running is commentry on the so called “Buffet Rule”, a proposed tax code change to force millionaires and up, to pay a tax rate that is  comparable to the average middle income family, or some such.

I think this is all losing perspective though, although both cases are dissimilar in practice, at their core, the complaints are about the same thing. While Apple is a worldwide corporation, with many share holders, to whom it owes a fiduciary responsibility to maximize profit, how it does it is the same as Buffett.

Changes in laws, it shouldn’t be needed. The billionaires and big companies are master of their own empires, they are not beholden to their accountants and tax advisors. They should move their investments on shore, make sure they are paying a fair wage to all their employees, provide decent health care etc. thats all everone else expects of them. Forcing the goverment to try to inact a law/rule change that is divisive purely because of the polarizing because of what it is trying to do, is just BS. when said billionaires and companies should know that they’d never had made their money in the first place in a weak, unhealthy country that was racked with division, decaying infrastructure, pollution, poorly educated children. JUST PAY YOUR TAXES, don’t avoid them.

Companies recently have spent a lot of time and effort dressing up their annual reports to show their environment and ethical efforts, it is time they did the same for fiscal fairness.

Mac Trojan news

It was only matter of time before there was a serious Apple Mac trojan or virus. I’m not gloating over it, more just warning many of my friends who felt like this was just a windows or pc problem.

“Flashback trojan have reportedly infected more than half a million Macs” yes, that means your Apple Mac is at risk. 57 percent of the infected Macs are located in the US and 20 percent are in Canada.

f-Secure.com has posted a set of reasonably technical instructions for checking and removing the trojan. Follow along step by step from here.

[Update April 5th] ZDNet picked up on this today.

East End Match Girls and Apple/FoxCon

I was struck by the similarity of the plight and treatment of the BRYANT & MAY MATCHWOMEN in the East End of London, in the 1880’s, and the hi-tech assembly workers at the FoxConn factories in China.

I heard an interview with Louise Raw, Historian and Author, on this mornings Robert Elms, BBC Radio London show, talking about her new book, Striking a Light. The comparison was really only around the plight of the workers than anything else. Thinking about it afterwards the scale of the hi-tech workers is staggering, Wired estimates 1-million workers working on the iPhone alone, which beggars belief.

The clear difference between the two is not just the number of deaths, the illness, the treatment etc. but the nature of the society that allowed both to exist. In the 1880’s the Bryant and May Matchwomen had the ability to incite change and the ability to start a union like organization. In China, it’s not at all clear this is even remotely possible.

If you can catch todays Robert Elms show on the BBC iPlayer, it’s well worth a listen. It should be posted by 1pm Central time, and will be available only for the next 7-days. Unless I get time to rip that section of the show and post to soundcloud.

Journalists would rather act as a gateway for Apple press releases

than do a real job”. Brilliant, sums up what I’ve thought for a longtime. No real examination of Apples products, no difficult questions, except recent coverage of their problems with manufacturing; the press would rather fawn over their products than do a critical examination.

Well this is a great summary of the upcoming Apple anouncement “Too many inky hacks pulled out to cover Apple instead. We, the Press would rather sit in a dark room, unable to ask tough questions or actually touch and test an Apple product, than do our job. We would rather serve as a gateway for Apple’s live action press releases.” You can read the rest here on Mat Honans’ Gizmodo blog.

Note in case this entry starts showing up on google search results, I’m not saying Apple has bad products, I wouldn’t know, I’ve never owned one and the press coverage doesn’t really tell you anything, it’s just an extension to Apples marketing operation, as Mat admits.

The implications of “Mastered for iTunes”

Picture of a sound meterNPR has an interesting blog entry on “What ‘Mastered For iTunes’ Really Means”. I hadn’t spotted this since I’ve been a life long Apple avoider. It’s not that I think Apple has bad products, it’s just they always, always look for a way to lock users into their systems. I’ve felt for a long time that the music industry would eventually find a way to strike back at MP3. In this case it makes perfect sense. Pay particular attenion to the last two paragraphs.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/02/24/147379760/what-mastered-for-itunes-really-means