Opinion | How Much Will Americans Sacrifice for Good Health Care? – The New York Times

Sadly, this New York Times Editorial op-ed is factually wrong in a material way that I had to write a letter. I also ripped into Dan Gorenstein on twitter(1) for linking to the article and “guessing” he didn’t think Americans would tolerate #MedicareForAll.

Here is the text I sent to the Times, who knows if they will publish it. My track record of getting corrections to editorial op-eds published is close to zero. It’s like they don’t want to be wrong.

The editorial board seems both confused, and factually inaccurate when it comes to how insurance works in government funded, single payer healthcare systems. It is common place in such systems to have an option of top-up insurance. I was lucky to have had such insurance when I needed serious surgery in the UK, in 1992. It was employer provided insurance.

One of the constraints in the many government single payer systems is the supply of buildings and doctors to treat a patient “on demand”. Urgent cases are as always seen as soon as they can be. Non-urgent cases, not so much. But then, medically, they are non-urgent. Top-up insurance allows patients to schedule both dates and locations, specialists for non-urgent treatment. The single payer system, pays an agreed amount for the treatment or surgery, much like Americas current insurance based system.

The difference is, that in America today there is massive over supply of both facilities and staff, specialists etc. That over supply is costing every one, both the insured and the uninsured, money for nothing. Yes, it’s great if you can walk into your local Dr’s today and get a referral to a specialist this afternoon for that annoying toe bunion that has bothered you for the past 6-months. Should our healthcare system be based on the costs of carrying that burden? Absolutely not.

While single payer systems are not perfect, nor is the current US Insurance based model. Almost everyone of the people that are involved in charging, finance, billing, negotiating, handling disputes, etc. is overhead. That overhead has to get paid for. So called “death panels” are more common in the US based insurance system than they are in single payer systems. In a single payer system there is no out of network, drug prices are controlled, and there is much more transparency. For everything else there is top-up insurance.

The editorial board overlooking this important fact, does a major dis-service to it’s readers and to Americans who continue to pay too much for healthcare.

Source: Opinion | How Much Will Americans Sacrifice for Good Health Care? – The New York Times

Missing the point of Healthcare costs

We managed to get Health Insurance sorted out for my wife and daughter, without falling into the trap of me getting covered by an ACA policy, which would put me in jeopardy of violating the “public charge” agreement I accepted when applying for my green card. I’m self-insuring for another year aka uninsurance.

Today I took my daughter to the dentist, she needed two baby teeth pulled to make way for her adult teeth. The insurance didn’t verify when they put it in. So I paid by card. In a subsequent phone call we went through the process of how to claim the money back. The process involves mailing in an invoice, the insurer authorising it, contacting the dentist and having them re-submit for insurance payments, and then finally refunding us our payments.

Of course, I won’t pay for any of this back and forward. Insurance does. Insurance will pay the broker and admin who finally were able to spend a full hour helping us get the forms submitted without putting me in legal jeopardy.

The paediatric dentist will absorb the cost of trying to get the bill paid through insurance, then after discounting their charges for “cash”, taking a hit for payment by card, and then there is all the additional admin that the dentist and the insurer will have to put in. None of that is free, it’s all rolled into the cost of insurance. Repeat that thousands of times per day over a population of 300+ million…

Before this episode is finished, it will have cost more for the admin than the dental treatment. That’s madness. That’s just one small reason why we pay so much for medical insurance, and it’s invisible.

The Real Reason Hospitals Are So Expensive

So much about this rings true, especially this segment. In essence I said I had no insurance and would pay cash. Most, but not all of my bill was instantly discounted by 60%.

I’m at about $38,500 now including follow-up, by minus drugs. I still have to work out how to pay that.

@potus isn’t the only one projecting

I’ve always understood the term “projecting” but it has been fascinating to see the press and media trying to make sense of the Presidents sometimes incoherent and unrelated public tweets and statements.

The best explanation is he is “Projecting”. That is he’s told something, or concerned about something and immediately make some form of statement about it. In many cases these things become apparent days, weeks or months later. There are write-ups on this here, here, and here.

I got a surprise on July 30th, I had a heart attack. My left anterior descending artery was completely blocked. I’ll deal with what happened and how and some of the sports related stuff over on my triman livejournal blog.

I thought it was worth stating this here, because I’ve been writing and even boasting somewhat about my lack of healthcare insurance, because I’ve been otherwise super fit and healthy. Turns out it would be fair to say, just like the President, to some extent I’ve been “projecting“.

See my posts here, here and here. And this with some irony now I’m unemployed and have no health insurance.

In a number of following posts, I’ll trace my efforts and my frustrations with what is already a $78,400 list of charges. The hospital has already been great, but there are already a number of important lessons learned, thos are what I’ll try to cover. I’ll be linking the posts with the tag https://markcathcart.com/category/uninsured/