Ethics the Texas Way

Just a few months ago, I’d have started this blog post with a comparison between Texas and a 3rd world government. Now, maybe I’ll be able to compare 1st term Texas Governor, Gregg Abbott with FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

BlabbottEvery FIFA Congress for as long as people can remember, Blatter has declared it’s time to clean up FIFA, as we know now, it’s never happened. Back in February, Governor Abbott declared five emergency proclamations for the 84th Legislature, The Governor’s issuance of an emergency item message to the Legislature enables that measure to be considered within the first 60 days of the legislative session.

Included in the five was this proclamation on ethics.

The faith and trust that Texas citizens place in their elected officials requires each of us to conduct the business of the state in the most transparent and honest manner possible. Strengthening our ethics laws relating to disclosure of state contracts with elected officials, prohibiting lawmakers from voting on legislation from which they could profit and increasing disclosure of campaign finance information will ensure a more responsible government for Texas.

So, the 60-days are up, they’ve pretentiously declared sine de which is a whole ‘nother issue. So, how’d the 84th Ledge do?

Well, in theory they had legislation to consider what were some of the most radical considered in years or even decades, including restricting legislators leaving and going straight to work as lobbyists, banning lawmakers from making money off of public debt-financing deals; and taking government pensions away from politicians who are convicted of public corruption charges.

In reality, what we got was

  • Special treatment for politicians and bureaucrats giving the ability to be tried in their home districts rather than where they commit corruption, giving them “home field advantage”.
  • A new way for Senators and Congressmen to avoid financial disclosure.
  • Continuing to avoid disclosing wining and dining by lobbyists.
  • A new spousal loophole that allows politicians to hide details about their spouses’ financial dealings.

What we did get was

  • Parity with the Federal bill that forced former Governor Perry and then (1st time) Presidential candidate Perry to disclose he was receiving a pension and salary at the same time from the State. Texas law at the time allowed this and allowed in to be secret.
  • A couple of other disclosure requirements including disclosing financial interests in State contracts.

Overall, pretty weak, hardly compelling, and definitely not the emergency legislation proclaimed. If Governor Abbott signs these changes into law, he has set course for a bi-annual Sepp Blatter moment.

If politicususa is right, and in actually went down like this, that’s pretty much how South Africa was awarded the 2014 World Cup minus the 15-deaths.

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Author: Mark Cathcart

Formerly an Executive Director of Systems Engineering and a Senior Distinguished Engineer at Dell. Prior to that, an IBM Distinguished Engineer working for the Systems Group in NY and Austin. I'm currently "retired until further notice".

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